Marvel Comics Final Thoughts – Son of M

Thanks to Marvel’s popular and successful foray into films with the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I’ve finally decided to get back into comics. I grew up a big fan of X-Men and other superheroes but haven’t really kept up since the 90s. Thus begins my grand catching-up of the last ten years of Marvel comics, events and stories.

Thanks in large part to trade paperbacks and the digital convenience of Marvel Unlimited I can make relatively quick progress, and I’ll write down my Final Thoughts for each collection here on my blog. Like my gaming Final Thoughts, this will be full of spoilers. You’ve been warned!

Son of M #1Writer: David Hine

Artist: Roy Allan Martinez

Issues: Son of M #1-6

Though I’m still constantly adding new series and comics to my reading list, I’ve learned to become much more choosy about where to apply my precious comic-reading time. I was originally going to skip the Decimation tie-in Son of M, which dealt with the now powerless Quicksilver.

One of the big twists at the end of House of M revealed that it was Pietro Maxmioff (Quicksilver) that convinced his sister Wanda (Scarlet Witch) to make the House of M world, which eventually lead to its destruction and the decimation of nearly every mutant on the planet. Pietro rightly comes off as a huge asshole and it’s karmic retribution that he’s one of the powerless mutants in the new world. When Issue #1 starts with him feeling super sorry for himself and longing for his speedy powers, he gets no sympathy from me.

But I’m glad I dived into it, as Son of M is deeply wrapped up in the Inhumans, a large isolationist group of superpowered people that gain their abilities by exposing themselves to their sacred Terrigen Mists. It’s increasingly looking like Inhumans may replace mutants in the MCU with both an upcoming film and major hints and teases in Agents of SHIELD. I knew very little about them, so when Crystal shows up at the end of the first issue (via their giant teleporting dog, Lockjaw) asking for her husband, I was intrigued (still kinda wish Spider-Man had just let him kill himself by jumping off a building).

The Inhumans have moved their city onto Earth’s moon – doesn’t get much more isolated than that, and generally stay away from anything to do with Earth. Pietro and Crystal have a daughter, now a little girl named Luna, and Peitro continues to be a huge jerk to everyone. We get some fun glimpses into Inhuman society as well as the bigger characters such as Videmus, Gorgon, Medusa and Black Bolt.

Son of M #6

Quicksilver takes two seconds to decide that he should sneak in and use the Mists on himself, which does allow him to regain his powers – sort of. Now he can move so fast he can travel through time, which always makes a plot that much more convoluted and strange to follow. In this case it’s even worse as Pietro makes a copy of himself when he does and frequently talks to a slightly older version of himself, which is even more confusing. Eventually he decides to steal the mists and kidnap his daughter (semi-willfully, she wants to see Earth but he’s totally manipulating her). His goal – to return to Earth and use the Mists to restore lost powers to mutants.

Pietro and Luna arrive in the ruins of Genosha where he meets up with the mutants from Excalibur. This is one of the first times where I was delighted to have prior knowledge of another comic as I recognized who they were. Unfortunately they don’t do all that much aside from take some hits of Mist that is a heavy-handed way of painting Quicksilver as a drug-dealer on top of everything else (oh and he exposes his too-young daughter to the mists and gets her hooked on them. Great guy, Quicksilver).

Magneto is also on Genosha and also depressed, but he correctly sees his son as a dangerous threat. Quicksilver uses his time-teleport power to beat the crap out of his old man and he’s only saved by his granddaughter intervening. Despite Magneto’s offensively fast resurrection between Morrison’s storyline of the early 2000s and the events of Excalibur, I’ve enjoyed his characterization as an older, wiser mutant filled with regrets and reflection, and generally still wanting to help his people, even without his powers.

son of m #6 black boltOf course the Inhumans weren’t going to stand idly by, and they reach Genosha around the same time as the Office of National Emergency. The Inhumans battle the Genoshan mutants and promptly kick their ass, while the O*N*E take down Quicksilver and grab the mists. The final confrontation occurs as the Inhumans demand the Mists returned and the US government refuses. In a rather awesome scene, Medusa says that Black Bolt will give his answer shortly, and the rest take off. The O*N*E commander starts freaking out, for Black Bolt’s voice is so powerful he can never speak lest he destroys everything around him. He whispers one word, “War,” and the entire army is utterly demolished. As someone that’s read about Black Bolt’s power but never seen it in action, it’s incredibly satisfying.

Thus the Inhumans officially declare war on the US, and the series ends as they have a final meeting with the Fantastic Four. Chronologically Civil War happens next, which would’ve been a great time for the Inhumans to attack, but they nicely waited until that mega-event was done to begin the limited series, Silent War that acts as the followup to this one.

If you couldn’t tell I despise Quicksilver even more after reading this comic. He’s easily my most hated person in the Marvel Universe after these events, essentially starting a horrible war and hurting his own daughter (most of the mist effects on mutants restore powers but only temporarily, and in undesirable ways). The real treat was seeing the Inhumans in action, and I very much look forward to Silent War to see even more.

The writing was well crafted and the art style had an interesting, washed-out, pencil-heavy look to it that I kind of dug. It’s just too bad our protagonist is such a horrible douche canoe.

Marvel Comics Final Thoughts – Decimation: X-Men – The Day After

Thanks to Marvel’s popular and successful foray into films with the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I’ve finally decided to get back into comics. I grew up a big fan of X-Men and other superheroes but haven’t really kept up since the 90s. Thus begins my grand catching-up of the last ten years of Marvel comics, events and stories.

Thanks in large part to trade paperbacks and the digital convenience of Marvel Unlimited I can make relatively quick progress, and I’ll write down my Final Thoughts for each collection here on my blog. Like my gaming Final Thoughts, this will be full of spoilers. You’ve been warned!

decimation cover

Writer: Chris Claremont (Decimation), Peter Milligan (X-Men)

Artists: Randy Green (Decimation), Salvador Larroca (X-Men)

Issues: Decimation: House of M – The Day After, X-Men (2004-2007) #177-181

There’s got to be a morning after….

While the eighth and final issue of the phenomenal House of M series (Final Thoughts) acted as the falling action/epilogue issue, the dramatic shift in the universe required an entire massive stand alone issue. The aftermath of the Scarlet Witch’s “No More Mutants” decree became known as Decimation.

Most of the world’s mutant population suddenly woke up no longer mutants, and this has far-reaching implications beyond just a few depowered heroes and villains (Blob’s piles of flesh is a grotesque and clever way of showing how some former mutants will have to cope). Entire political parties and organizations crumble, and waves of violence threaten every corner of the world as both former mutants lash out and pro-humans see it as a reckoning to end mutants once and for all.

Functionally the massive one-shot Decimation issue sets up several mini-series centered around the X-Men in the coming months, as well as the story-lines and situations directly affecting the other main X-Men series (save for Whedon’s Astonishing X-Men, which glaringly doesn’t care a fig about what else is happening). Decimation introduces Generation M, Sentinel Squad O*N*E, The 198, Son of M, X-Factor and eventually Deadly Genesis. I read a few of them and will feature each one in its own Final Thoughts (Each are 5-issue limited series, with the exception of X-Factor which becomes an incredibly successful series on its own).

As a lead in to those various story-lines and the state of the world (specifically Xavier’s Mansion), Decimation is essential, though not all that great on its own. Cyclops offers sanctuary to every remaining mutant, and the newly appointed Sentinel Squad (sentinels piloted by people) arrive to help out and protect everyone inside the makeshift refugee camp that’s set up right outside the mansion (further told in The 198).

x-men 179 coverThe actual trade paperback also includes issues #177-181 of the ongoing X-Men series. As I mentioned back in my Astonishing X-Men Final Thoughts, my favorite mutants were split up into three ongoing series back in 2004. Just plain X-Men was compromised of Iceman, Havok, Polaris, Rogue, Gambit and of course Wolverine (who’s in every team and also an Avenger. It’s kind of an old joke by now).

Issue #177 picks up directly after the Decimation one-shot, and has the team fighting off the newly arrived sentinels before realizing they’re technically here to help (at least half of all comic book fights are simple misunderstandings). The three-issue story arc, “House Arrest,” quickly ‘fixes’ Iceman’s supposed de-powering by making it all in his head, whereas Polaris is one of the few X-Men to have legitimately lost hers.

The issues are a sporadic mess as Claremont is setting up multiple spinning plates on top of a rocky foundation. There’s the Blood of Apocalypse tease, the O*N*E introductions, the Sapien league villains and a super dumb side story where Polaris and Havok quit the team (the two-issue “What Lorna Saw” arc in #180-181). I also vehemently can’t stand Salvador Larroca’s art work. I can handle a more cartoon-y, crisper art style (though I definitely prefer darker and more grizzled looks on my heroes) but Larroca’s borderline anime style irks me in all the wrong ways, and honestly just destroys my ability to enjoy the series. I can usually enjoy various artists’ interpretations of characters and style but I officially met my limits with the X-Men series.

House of M essentially did to the X-Men what Avengers Disassembled did to the Avengers – change their dynamic and situation for years to come. Decimation provides a useful introduction to all the spiffy new mini-series that are created in the aftermath, but X-Men really drops the ball in offering a satisfying new angle. X-Men lasted another 25 issues so I’ll probably check back with it for the major storylines (Blood of Apocalypse and Messiah Complex), but I’ll stick to Uncanny X-Men and Astonishing X-Men to get my mutant fill.

x-men 177