D&D 5E – “Lost Mine of Phandelver” Session 5 Recap

More than just Redbrands lurk in their hideout as the PCs battle a horrific subterranean terror.

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Watch our sessions live on my YouTube channel every Sunday night beginning at 9:30pm Central. Subscribe and catch up on previous episodes!

 

It wasn’t until this week’s session that I realized a big part of role-playing that I had missed in Shadowrun – monsters.

I’ve always enjoyed dipping my toes into dramatic voice acting, and I feel like my skills and range have steadily improved over the last few years thanks to reading to my young daughter nearly every day. In Shadowrun most of the foes and NPCs were gangsters, mobsters, businessmen, hackers, etc. I had fun with some unique accents and speech patterns, but nothing too crazy.

Dungeons & Dragons, however, has actual monsters. Demons, fiends, aberrations, undead – lots of fun opportunities for creepy whispers and foul mutterings.

“Lost Mine of Phandelver” includes a rather unique creature called a Nothic – an insane, twisted former mage with clawed hands and a single eye. It feeds on flesh and communicates telepathically – a wonderful excuse to unnerve my players as it steels into their minds, searches for their secrets and their past while gibbering about rending, tearing, GNAWING, biting, feeeediiiing. It was a lot of fun, but I’m getting ahead of myself. Continue reading “D&D 5E – “Lost Mine of Phandelver” Session 5 Recap”

Marvel Comics Final Thoughts – Captain America: The Man With No Face

With Steve Rogers dead, Bucky Barnes grapples with wearing the uniform and the terrible things he did as the Winter Soldier.

With Marvel’s popular and successful foray into films with the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I’ve finally decided to get back into comics. I grew up a big fan of X-Men and other superheroes but haven’t really kept up since the 90s. Thus begins my grand catching-up of the last ten years of Marvel comics, events and stories.

Thanks in large part to trade paperbacks and the digital convenience of Marvel Unlimited I can make relatively quick progress, and I’ll write down my Final Thoughts for each collection here on my blog. Like my gaming Final Thoughts, this will be full of spoilers. You’ve been warned!

marvelWriter: Ed Brubaker

Artists: Steve Epting, Butch Guice

Issues: Captain America (2004) #43-48

 

Been awhile since I read Ed Brubaker’s fantastic Captain America series, which began in 2004. The last volume I read was a gigantic 20 page tome covering everything from the Civil War to Steve Rogers’ death to former Winter Soldier Bucky picking up the shield.

The six issue volume The Man With No Face continues Bucky Barnes’ adventures as faux Captain America, while also battling his own guilt of the assassinations and killings he performed as the brainwashed Winter Soldier. Continue reading “Marvel Comics Final Thoughts – Captain America: The Man With No Face”

My Final Thoughts on Ready Player One

Starring an intriguing virtual reality gaming world, Ready Player One ended up one of the most dissatisfying books I’ve ever read.

Ready player oneThere’s a sci-fi adventure book replete with lots of neat gaming, 80s, and general nerd-culture references? And Steven Spielberg is making a movie out of it? I’ll have to check this out!

Nearly 400 pages later I finally put it down, and thought about one of the most dissatisfying experiences of a book I’d ever read.

Published back in 2011 and written by Ernest Cline, Ready Player One stars Wade Watts, a typical gamer shut-in with poor social skills and obsessive attitudes. The fact that I just said ‘typical gamer’ followed by an awful stereotype is a big clue toward how I felt about the entire experience.

Wade’s world is a near-future 2044 (I don’t know why sci-fi authors insist on giving us an actual year) in which a gradual dystopia has made life generally terrible for everyone. No real apocalypse has taken place, but everything is awful, or at least written from someone with a tiresome, cynical and nihilistic view of the future. Continue reading “My Final Thoughts on Ready Player One”

D&D 5E – “Lost Mine of Phandelver” Session 4 Recap

The heroes explore the rest of Phandalin, gather quests, and begin their excursion into the underground Redbrand base.

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Watch our sessions live on my YouTube channel every Sunday night beginning at 9:30pm Central. Subscribe and catch up on previous episodes!

 

With this week’s session our heroes finished visiting the various important NPCs in Phandalin, then struck out to Tresendar Manor and cleared the first two rooms of Rebrands in the underground cellar.

Every RPG group is different. Some prefer nonstop combat and min-maxing their characters, squeezing every ounce of power out of the rules. Others are in it for the story, and enjoy role-playing their characters, exploring the world, and talking with NPCs. My group, like most, is somewhere in the middle, but definitely leaning more on the video game side of the experience. By that I mean they like solving problems, getting direction/quests from NPCs, and tackling dungeons, defeating monsters, and acquiring loot.

Knowing this I set up the town of Phandalin very much like a video game by pointing out all the notable NPCs that had relevant information or a quest available. A floating yellow exclamation point, if you will. This worked really well as the PCs were able to go around and visit each location, have a quick dialogue scene, gain a quest, and move on to the next one. In a single hour we were able to tackle the Lionshield Coster, Woodworker (which I custom added as a crime scene based on built-in events), Miner Exchange, Alderleaf Farm, Edermath Orchard, and Sleeping Giant Taphouse. Continue reading “D&D 5E – “Lost Mine of Phandelver” Session 4 Recap”

Marvel Comics Final Thoughts – Dark Avengers, Vol. 1

Norman Osborn leads his own team of ex-villain Avengers as part of his Dark Reign takeover of Marvel.

With Marvel’s popular and successful foray into films with the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I’ve finally decided to get back into comics. I grew up a big fan of X-Men and other superheroes but haven’t really kept up since the 90s. Thus begins my grand catching-up of the last ten years of Marvel comics, events and stories.

Thanks in large part to trade paperbacks and the digital convenience of Marvel Unlimited I can make relatively quick progress, and I’ll write down my Final Thoughts for each collection here on my blog. Like my gaming Final Thoughts, this will be full of spoilers. You’ve been warned!

marvelWriter: Brian Michael Bendis

Artist: Mike Deodato

Issues: Dark Avengers #1-6

 

“My name is Norman Osborn, and I approve these Dark Avengers.”

The time period around 2009, Dark Reign, was Marvel’s not so subtle attempt at The Empire Strikes Back – a dark middle chapter where the villains seemingly win and the good guys go into hiding.

The political and social waves hit a crescendo during the skrull Secret Invasion. As then Director of SHIELD, Tony Stark was blamed for much of the disaster, while Norman Osborn and his team of Thunderbolts saved the day in the end. Thanks to some savvy manipulations, the former Green Goblin is given Stark’s job, dissolves SHIELD and creates HAMMER (“We’ll come up with what it stands for later”).

As part of his newly expanded role, Osborn creates his own Avengers squad. He has the keys to Avengers tower and brings in most of his Thunderbolts and a few new faces to create a villainous squad masquerading as heroes – which is exactly what the Thunderbolts were minus the literal donning of hero costumes. (Interestingly the Thunderbolts series would continue with a different team full of D-listers).

Most of the original Mighty Avengers squad get the hell out of dodge, with the exception of the easily manipulated, mentally disabled Sentry and aggressive God of War Ares. They’re joined by former Thunderbolts Venom (with drugs that allow him to look like black-suited Spider-Man), Bullseye (wearing Hawkeye’s costume), and Moonstone (dressed as Ms. Marvel’s Binary costume). Osborn brings in Daken (dressed as his father, Wolverine) and Noh-Var (Marvel Boy, pretending to me Captain Marvel). Finally Osborn himself suits up in one of Iron Man’s armors, calling himself Iron Patriot.

Dark Avengers #1

Whew, confused yet? That’s quite the roster, and pretty awful when it comes to diversity. Like Thunderbolts this is a team of not-quite reformed villains. The in-fighting and drama is high in every issue, though with so many members it’s often a montage of one-liners and quick scenes.

The first Volume highlights one major story arc in the first four issues. Dr. Doom returns to Latveria only to be attacked by a pissed off Morgana Le Fay. The two engage in a heated magical battle that leaves Doom disabled, and the Dark Avengers are flown in to help him.

Mike Deodato’s artwork is absolutely breathtaking. I’m pretty sure he’s my favorite Marvel artist of everything I’ve seen thus far. The colors are deep and vibrant, characters look amazing while avoiding the glossy look (cough Greg Land cough) and action sequences are just incredible. Deodato loves the two-page spreads – even with scenes that are little more than extended dialogue sequences. Scenes are given dynamic poses and interesting panel construction that make everything that much more exciting to read. It’s a visual feast in every issue, and Deodato’s art absolutely elevates the otherwise so-so storytelling.

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Eventually Osborn works with Doom to defeat Morgana. The whole story boils down to one big action sequence with Morgana’s magic demons, and because the art is so great it’s fun as hell.

Afterward the Dark Avengers are given a whole issue to lick their wounds and explore the team’s volatile dynamic – Venom is fed victims of each battle, Bullseye is still a barely hinged psychopath, Moonstone has her own agenda, and Noh-Var has disappeared. The most interesting is Osborn’s interaction with the Sentry. He goes full on psychotherapist and uses his own very real inner demon to help Sentry cope with his. It actually paints Osborn in a favorable, sympathetic light, even though he’s using the Sentry as a powerful weapon.

Osborn soon has need for his ultimate weapon when a random Atlantean terrorist cell attacks. Namor is brought in as a brief but delicious cameo as someone that doesn’t take any of Osborn’s shit. Instead of seguing into another action-packed battle with the team, they send Sentry to basically kill them all.

marvel

Osborn only barely holds the team together and his grasp is constantly paper thin. I enjoy the way Bendis writes Osborn and focuses on his political savvy when it comes to public relations, like in a scene where the real Hawkeye denounces Osborn publicly on air, and Osborn is forced to make a statement. His interaction as babysitter and general for the team remains enjoyable throughout the volume, and ends with his own inner demon – the Green Goblin, calling to him.

Dark Avengers is a neat idea, though this first volume mostly plays it safe and retreads much of the same road walked by Thunderbolts (who’s Ultimate Collection was also drawn by Deodato). As the Dark Avengers their profiles are much higher, but the implication that they’re pretending to be the heroes they’re not is sadly not fully explored. I definitely hope Bendis gives these cool concepts a chance to grow. As it is this first volume is still a fun romp, made extra awesome with Deodato’s fantastic art.

 

Early Access Preview – ARK: Survival Evolved

With an island full of dinosaurs to tame and ride, ARK: Survival Evolved is the most compelling survival game I’ve ever played

Read the full preview at Pixelkin

ark survival evolved

I spotted the peaceful parasaurolophus drinking by the river. I sent a rock flying from my crude slingshot, and my tamed pair of dilophosaurus shot out from beside me, chasing the fleeing herbivore across the water.

Dangerous things lurk in the water, like megapiranhas. I was nearly killed just making the brief swim. I lacked a Chris Pratt-style motorcycle and quickly lost sight of both my quarry and my dinosaurs.

On the far side of the river, I watched in stunned silence as a Spinosaurus attacked a herd of brontosaurus. I was snapped back to reality as a pair of giant killer wasps suddenly bore down on me. I fled right into a pack of wild dilophosaurus. My screen turned black as their spit hit my face, and I died to a frenzy of claws and teeth.

Welcome to the world of ARK: Survival Evolved, a prehistoric island where humans are the lowest on the food chain.

ARK: Survival Evolved contains the usual checklist for the popular survival genre that can trace its roots back to Minecraft: constant food and water needs, building and crafting increasingly complex buildings and items, and a big world to explore.

ARK also happens to be one of the best-selling games of the year, though it’s still in Early Access. Originally launched on Steam in June, ARK had the distinct advantage of featuring a gorgeous premise with an island full of dinosaurs and other prehistoric critters right when Jurassic World was taking over the cinema. Since then ARK has gone on to sell over a million copies, becoming a huge hit on Twitch.tv and YouTube.

Read the full preview at Pixelkin

Image Comics Final Thoughts – Saga, Vol. 4

Saga Volume Four focuses a bit too much on predictable family drama, but remains one of the best stories in modern comics.

With Marvel’s popular and successful foray into films with the Marvel Cinematic Universe, I’ve finally decided to get back into comics. I grew up a big fan of X-Men and other superheroes but haven’t really kept up since the 90s. Thus begins my grand catching-up of the last ten years of Marvel comics, events and stories.

Of course, occasionally I may even explore comics outside of Marvel if they come highly recommended or simply peak my interest. Like my gaming Final Thoughts, this will be full of spoilers. You’ve been warned!

Saga volume 4Writer: Brian K. Vaughan

Artist: Fiona Staples

Issues: Saga #19-24

 

The following phrases were exclaimed during my time with Saga‘s fourth volume:

“Whoa.”
“Ha!”
“Awww.”
“Oh no…”
“Wow!”
“Hehe.”
“Holy shit!”
“Crap crap crap”
“Holy hell.”
“Oh shit.”
“Oh snap – hell yeah!”

I devoured Saga Volume Four in a single day. The incredible (yet incredibly relatable) adventures and drama of new parents Alana and Marko continue to be one of the most impressive stories in modern comics.

Vaughan effortlessly builds an intriguing cast of wacky guest-stars and returning favorites, and isn’t afraid to kill or main them (or have sexy time) in a maturity level that would make Game of Thrones blush. Fiona Staples continues to be one of my favorite artists working in comics. While Saga Volume Four may be the weakest volume I’ve read thanks to some predictable family drama, that’s mostly due to how amazing the first three volumes were. Continue reading “Image Comics Final Thoughts – Saga, Vol. 4”